Tag Archives: internet_governance

Help Shape the Future of the Internet

This year, the Internet Society celebrates its 25th anniversary. Our own history is inextricably tied to the history of the Internet. We were founded in 1992 by Internet pioneers who believed that “a society would emerge from the idea that is the Internet” — and they were right.

As part of the celebration, this September we will launch a comprehensive report that details the key forces that could impact the future of the Internet. The report will also offer recommendations for the Future and we need your input.

Our work on this started last year, when we engaged with a broad community of Members, Chapters, Internet experts and partners. We conducted two global surveys that generated more than 2,500 responses representing the business, public policy, civil society, Internet development, academic and technology communities from 160 countries and economies. Individuals from 94% of the Internet Society’s global chapters participated in the survey. We interviewed more than 130 Internet experts and hosted 15 virtual roundtables. My colleague Sally Wentworth has shared some thoughts on these conversations as she presented the project to UN trade experts in April, in Geneva.

Throughout the project, our community reaffirmed the importance of six “Drivers of Change” and identified three areas that will be significantly impacted in the future: Digital Divides; Personal Freedoms and Rights; and, Media, Culture and Society. These “Impact Areas” are core to the Internet Society’s focus on putting the user at the forefront when considering the future of the Internet.

This has been community-driven from the beginning to the end, and as we reach the final stage, we would like your input on recommendations for Internet leaders and policy makers to ensure the development of an open, trusted, accessible, and global Internet in the future.

We’ll discuss these recommendations in September at our global membership meeting, InterCommunity 2017. It’s open to all.

Unleash your imagination. Tell us how we can address emerging issues while harnessing the opportunities that the future will bring.

Note: This post originally appeared on the Internet Society blog.

Written by Constance Bommelaer, Senior Director, Global Internet Policy, Internet Society

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Al-Jazeera, HuffPost Arabi Among 21 News Sites Blocked by Egypt, Plus Possible Legal Action

At least 21 news sites critical of the government in Egypt, including the Qatari channel Al-Jazeera and Huffington Post’s Arabic-language site HuffPost Arabi, have been blocked. Ruth Michaelson reporting in The Guardian: “The state-run news agency Mena announced late on Wednesday night that 21 websites had been blocked because they were ‘spreading lies’ and ‘supporting terrorism’. The full list of banned sites was not provided, but Mena added that legal action against the outlets was forthcoming. … The blocking of the 21 sites followed raids on several news sites in Cairo, even those with little history of critical coverage.”

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It’s Up to Each of Us: Why I WannaCry for Collaboration

WannaCry, or WannaCrypt, is one of the many names of the piece of ransomware that impacted the Internet last week, and will likely continue to make the rounds this week.

There are a number of takeaways and lessons to learn from the far-reaching attack that we witnessed. Let me tie those to voluntary cooperation and collaboration which together represent the foundation for the Internet’s development. The reason for making this connection is because they provide the way to get the global cyber threat under control. Not just to keep ourselves and our vital systems and services protected, but to reverse the erosion of trust in the Internet.

The attack impacted financial services, hospitals, medium and small size businesses. It was an attack that will also impact trust in the Internet because it immediately and directly impacted people in their day-to-day lives. One specific environment raises everybody’s eyebrows: Hospitals.

Let’s share a few takeaways:

On Shared Responsibility

The solutions here are not easy: they depend on the actions of many. Solutions depend on individual actors to take action and solutions depend on shared responsibility.

Fortunately, there are a number of actors that take their responsibility. There is a whole set of early responders, funded by private and public sector, and sometimes volunteers, that immediately set out to analyze the malware and collaborate to find root-causes, share experience, work with vendors, and provide insights to provide specific counter attack.

On the other hand, it is clear that not all players are up to par. Some have done things (clicked on links in mails that spread the damage) or not done things (deployed a firewall, not backed up data, or upgraded to the latest OS version) that exaggerated this problem.

When you are connected to the Internet, you are part of the Internet, and you have a responsibility to do your part.

On proliferation of digital knowledge

The bug that was exploited by this malware purportedly came out of a leaked NSA cache of stockpiled zero-days. There are many lessons, but fundamentally the lesson is that data one keeps can, and perhaps will, eventually leak. Whether we talk about privacy related data-breaches or ‘backdoors’ in cryptography, one needs to assume that knowledge, once out, is available on the whole of the Internet.

Permissionless innovation

The attackers abused the openness of the environment — one of the fundamental properties of the Internet itself. That open environment allows for new ideas to be developed on a daily basis and also allows those to become global. Unfortunately, those new innovations are available for abuse too. The uses of Bitcoins for the payment of ransom is an example of that. We should try to preserve the inventiveness of the Internet.

It is also our collective responsibility to promote innovation for the benefit of the people and to deal collectively with bad use of tools. Above all, the solutions to the security challenges we face should not limit the power of innovation that the Internet allows.

Internet and Society

Society is impacted by these attacks. This is clearly not an Internet-only issue. This attack upset people, rightfully so. People have to solve these issues, technology doesn’t have all the answers, nor does a specific sector. When looking for leadership, the idea that there is a central authority that can solve all this is a mistake.

The leadership is with us all, we have to tackle these issues with urgency, in a networked way. At the Internet Society we call that Collaborative Security. Let’s get to work.

This post is a reprint of a blog published at the Internet Society.

Written by Olaf Kolkman, Chief Internet Technology Officer (CITO), Internet Society

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Why Not Connect Cuba’s Gaspar Social Streetnet to the Internet?

I’ve been covering Cuban streetnets (local area networks with independent users that are not connected to the Internet) for some time. Reader Doug Madory told me about Gaspar Social, a new streetnet in Gaspar, a small town in central Cuba. Gaspar Social opened to the public last October and has grown quickly — about 500 of Gaspar’s 7,500 residents are now users.

Streetnets are illegal in Cuba and the government has ignored some and cracked down on others, but they seem to be tolerating them now as long as they remain apolitical and avoid pornography and other controversial material. Last month, Communist Party officials noticed Gaspar Social but did not shut it down. Yoandi Alvarez, one of the network creators, said “they made it clear our network was illegal but they wouldn’t be taking our antennas down” and they were given instructions for applying for a permit.

So, residents of Gaspar can play games, download software, share files, socialize, etc., but they can not access the global Internet. Why not connect Gaspar Social to the Internet?

Gaspar is in the province of Ciego de Ávila and the capital city is Ciego de Ávila. ETECSA has six WiFi hotspots and three navigation rooms in Ciego de Ávila and, as a provincial capital, the city must have many government, medical and educational users. In other words, there must be relatively fast backhaul to the Internet in Ciego de Ávila.

Connecting Gaspar to Ciego de Ávila seems like it would be cheap and easy. As you see below, they are only 28.2 kilometers apart on the road (25 kilometers as the crow flies) and the terrain is flat. (Gaspar’s elevation is 5.1 meters and Ciego de Ávila’s 49 meters).

They could be connected with a high-speed wireless link or fiber. The flat terrain favors a wireless link and the road could provide a right-of-way for fiber. Installing 28 kilometers of fiber would be expensive in the US, but Cuba is not the US. One can imagine a community project using International Telecommunication Union (ITU) L.1700 cable. (For an example of a community fiber project, in Bhutan, click here).

ETECSA is the elephant in this hypothetical room. The ITU tracks regulatory evolution and, as of 2013, Cuba was one of the few remaining first-generation (regulated public monopoly) nations.

I suggested earlier that ETECSA consider streetnets as complementary collaborators rather than competitors or outlaws and last year they allowed a small streetnet to connect to a WiFi hotspot.

Cuba has a well-deserved reputation for improvisation and appropriate-technology innovation. I am not suggesting that they jump suddenly to fourth-generation regulation (regulation led by economic and social policy goals), but that they run a pilot test, connecting Gaspar Social to the Internet.

Here is a short video (1:56) on Gaspar Social:

And here is a longer video (13:48) with interviews of the network creators:

Written by Larry Press, Professor of Information Systems at California State University

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Why Not Connect Cuba’s Gaspar Social Streetnet to the Internet?

I’ve been covering Cuban streetnets (local area networks with independent users that are not connected to the Internet) for some time. Reader Doug Madory told me about Gaspar Social, a new streetnet in Gaspar, a small town in central Cuba. Gaspar Social opened to the public last October and has grown quickly — about 500 of Gaspar’s 7,500 residents are now users.

Streetnets are illegal in Cuba and the government has ignored some and cracked down on others, but they seem to be tolerating them now as long as they remain apolitical and avoid pornography and other controversial material. Last month, Communist Party officials noticed Gaspar Social but did not shut it down. Yoandi Alvarez, one of the network creators, said “they made it clear our network was illegal but they wouldn’t be taking our antennas down” and they were given instructions for applying for a permit.

So, residents of Gaspar can play games, download software, share files, socialize, etc., but they can not access the global Internet. Why not connect Gaspar Social to the Internet?

Gaspar is in the province of Ciego de Ávila and the capital city is Ciego de Ávila. ETECSA has six WiFi hotspots and three navigation rooms in Ciego de Ávila and, as a provincial capital, the city must have many government, medical and educational users. In other words, there must be relatively fast backhaul to the Internet in Ciego de Ávila.

Connecting Gaspar to Ciego de Ávila seems like it would be cheap and easy. As you see below, they are only 28.2 kilometers apart on the road (25 kilometers as the crow flies) and the terrain is flat. (Gaspar’s elevation is 5.1 meters and Ciego de Ávila’s 49 meters).

They could be connected with a high-speed wireless link or fiber. The flat terrain favors a wireless link and the road could provide a right-of-way for fiber. Installing 28 kilometers of fiber would be expensive in the US, but Cuba is not the US. One can imagine a community project using International Telecommunication Union (ITU) L.1700 cable. (For an example of a community fiber project, in Bhutan, click here).

ETECSA is the elephant in this hypothetical room. The ITU tracks regulatory evolution and, as of 2013, Cuba was one of the few remaining first-generation (regulated public monopoly) nations.

I suggested earlier that ETECSA consider streetnets as complementary collaborators rather than competitors or outlaws and last year they allowed a small streetnet to connect to a WiFi hotspot.

Cuba has a well-deserved reputation for improvisation and appropriate-technology innovation. I am not suggesting that they jump suddenly to fourth-generation regulation (regulation led by economic and social policy goals), but that they run a pilot test, connecting Gaspar Social to the Internet.

Here is a short video (1:56) on Gaspar Social:

And here is a longer video (13:48) with interviews of the network creators:

Written by Larry Press, Professor of Information Systems at California State University

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More under: Access Providers, Internet Governance, Policy & Regulation

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